CyHi the Prince Drops “No Dope On Sundays” Album

It is with great honor to announce CyHi the Prynce’s album release “No Dope On Sundays”, a highly anticipated project amongst his following and a breakout moment for those who are newly introduced.

Why this is a privilege is because this MC is a hidden gem to the naked eye no longer. CyHi the Prynce comes with major bars, blending his life in the streets with growing up in the church.  For the true brethren bred in Babylon, each disciple testifies to their spiritual walk. CyHi’s “No Dope On Sundays”documents a life of parallel and paradox, inviting Pusha T, Schoolboy Q, 2-Chainz, BJ The Chicago Kid, Travis Scott, Estelle, Jagged Edge, Kanye West and Ernestine Johnson to join him on the journey.

 CyHi guides listeners through the perils of his plight to the end of a tunnel where light glows with a promise of redemption.  He takes us back to the Cocaine 80’s when women were especially vulnerable to the effects poverty, often so consumed by its challenges that there was barely the wherewithal to pay attention to one’s own body. CyHi’s mother had no idea she was pregnant with him until she was six months in, consuming drugs and alcohol in her unawareness.  At this point, his destiny was a coin toss.

As seen time and time again with black youth abandoned by the public school system, CyHi the Prynce would go on to become a student of life well before his adult years. He was kicked out of school and forced to define a new path for himself. He would utilize his three- dimensional experience of family, faith and street life as a tool to turn his life into a blessing.  All sorts of innovative outcomes are produced in Ghettoes that typically operate as a right-brain world with a left-brain mentality. Every move is life or death and requires strategy. As a result of this struggle, a thin line between Underground Hip Hop and Pop Culture is heartfelt, because a paradox exists where Black African Natives are pushed into underserved communities and treated like experiments until their “worth” is proven in Colonial American terms. Then their innovations are taken to a mainstream market and flipped into processed factory food through the chain-of-supply.  Although there is nothing wrong with reproducing something that works, CyHi notes the evolution of black culture while exploring Pan-Africanism and holding black cultural values to their own standard in ways that further elevate their communities.

 “No Dope On Sundays” is an amazing documentary that moves the spirit and still holds true to the streets.  It can be archived with other great Hip Hop projects in its integrity and ability to fuse classic Hip Hop with contemporary styles so seamlessly.   For an in-depth conversation of “No Dope On Sundays”with CyHi the Prynce, please visit NPR Radio’s coverage for more!

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