DeCyphered -x- Rap Sessions: Hassan N’ Prodi-G

thezezropoint blog hassan cover jpg

Atlanta’s lyrical duo Hassan N’ Prodi-G bring its generation a type of eternal classic by way of Al Morocco’s youngest musical ancestor; Hip Hop.

With their upcoming project Melanated dropping soon, thought-provoking brain food from their latest single “Wipe Ya Feet” are bejeweled with infinite knowledge and power sincerely delivered with the finesse of classic Hip Hop.

Prodi-G’s provocatively infused verses texturize each Melody’s Jazzy character, with a cadence that gives its polished sound a raw grit in the truth of “Wipe Ya Feet”. The weight of Prodi-G’s fearless delivery is worth a finger snap or two simply for the bravery of its honesty.


Not only do they deliver pristine quality of substance, Hassan N’ Prodi-G manage to utilize their Lion-like sway without gang violence promotion or misogynous content. However, Hassan is quick to honor the lessons such instances present, like views on the way life works in “The Game”. His clever anecdote will have you thinking twice about what you hear versus what you’ve actually heard. The intricacies are well endowed in offering a fresh perspective to be taken away each time, like a classic BlackStar record.

Their upcoming project emblazons predecessors like Mobb Deep and Outkast, reflecting upon great wisdom while addressing the imbalance of Human society today – particularly for the Melanated.Subconsciously or not, Hassan N’ Prodi-G aide in keeping the culture, helping the group to stand out amongst others by forever residing in the soil which keeps HipHop fruitful.

Overdoz Finally Releases “2008” Album!

Overdoz-Releases-2008-Album
Overdoz finally releases their long-awaited album “2008”

Overdoz finally drops its album 2008, with fans eagerly awaiting its release since…well, 2008! If you’ve never heard of them, say hello to these West Coast rock stars, whose name rings bells across the land from Dena to South Los Angeles and beyond.

The brothers have been together since day one, chillin’ on avenues and cruising highways most Cali Natives would only pass through.  Documenting their journeys in LA, Overdoz takes us back as far as 2008, When Everybody Loved Everybody.

One thing most people don’t know much about is 4711 Expo, the studio where several paths crossed, including the likes of Miguel, ASAP Rocky, Jhene Aiko, Dom Kennedy, the Fistacuffs, THC, and several other aspiring local artists who would collaborate. Folks from every hood would come together in the name of creation where this studio once stood, including Overdoz. It was the block no one would want to walk through at night, with burnt out light posts unworthy of fixing and street-life exchange on every corner.

Today, these old warehouses are barely recognizable, developed into the types of contemporary décor that typically follow gentrification shortly thereafter. Coffee shops and industrial conversions are tucked away on streets where underserved communities of color were once left destitute long after the LA riots had given way to an influx of black wealth amongst the Baldwin Hills, Ladera, Leimert Park, & Crenshaw areas. Although Ujima and Ujamaa principles were reserved amongst several families in the area, others would choose to take their earnings and resources outside of the community, creating an interesting dynamic between rich and poor black families from the hills down to the flat lands. These areas would later face troubles self-sustaining, but the Youth of these local towns would go on to create great art.

2008 is an important project for several reasons. Film director Calmatic has been working with Overdoz for several years, catching controversial footage like Overdoz’s “Rich White Friends” and landmarks that may someday be archived as a blast from the past alongside other monumental black eras, like the times of Black Hollywood in West Adams. These places are important to Los Angeles culture, as they are what make Southern Cali one of the dopest spots across the globe. Of course, such locations would simply be architecture if not for the people who create its diverse artistry, of which Overdoz is a part of.

Their charismatic and quirky humor blends a conscious lyrical wordplay with notes of funk, acid jazz, neo – soul and West Coast HipHop. Someday I imagine them sharing memories as old men in one of these new cafes around here, maybe even some coffee shop that sprouts up near 4711 Expo just for the irony of it.

images courtesy of hotnewhiphop.com

CyHi the Prince Drops “No Dope On Sundays” Album

It is with great honor to announce CyHi the Prynce’s album release “No Dope On Sundays”, a highly anticipated project amongst his following and a breakout moment for those who are newly introduced.

Why this is a privilege is because this MC is a hidden gem to the naked eye no longer. CyHi the Prynce comes with major bars, blending his life in the streets with growing up in the church.  For the true brethren bred in Babylon, each disciple testifies to their spiritual walk. CyHi’s “No Dope On Sundays”documents a life of parallel and paradox, inviting Pusha T, Schoolboy Q, 2-Chainz, BJ The Chicago Kid, Travis Scott, Estelle, Jagged Edge, Kanye West and Ernestine Johnson to join him on the journey.

 CyHi guides listeners through the perils of his plight to the end of a tunnel where light glows with a promise of redemption.  He takes us back to the Cocaine 80’s when women were especially vulnerable to the effects poverty, often so consumed by its challenges that there was barely the wherewithal to pay attention to one’s own body. CyHi’s mother had no idea she was pregnant with him until she was six months in, consuming drugs and alcohol in her unawareness.  At this point, his destiny was a coin toss.

As seen time and time again with black youth abandoned by the public school system, CyHi the Prynce would go on to become a student of life well before his adult years. He was kicked out of school and forced to define a new path for himself. He would utilize his three- dimensional experience of family, faith and street life as a tool to turn his life into a blessing.  All sorts of innovative outcomes are produced in Ghettoes that typically operate as a right-brain world with a left-brain mentality. Every move is life or death and requires strategy. As a result of this struggle, a thin line between Underground Hip Hop and Pop Culture is heartfelt, because a paradox exists where Black African Natives are pushed into underserved communities and treated like experiments until their “worth” is proven in Colonial American terms. Then their innovations are taken to a mainstream market and flipped into processed factory food through the chain-of-supply.  Although there is nothing wrong with reproducing something that works, CyHi notes the evolution of black culture while exploring Pan-Africanism and holding black cultural values to their own standard in ways that further elevate their communities.

 “No Dope On Sundays” is an amazing documentary that moves the spirit and still holds true to the streets.  It can be archived with other great Hip Hop projects in its integrity and ability to fuse classic Hip Hop with contemporary styles so seamlessly.   For an in-depth conversation of “No Dope On Sundays”with CyHi the Prynce, please visit NPR Radio’s coverage for more!

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